Sunday, December 6, 2009

Stained Glass Scarf

This scarf was inspired by the stained glass works of Frank Lloyd Wright. I love the vibrant colors with the black outline; however, it also looks very pretty in pastels or shades of the same color. LOOK HERE  to see several versions in my Ravelry project gallery. They are all very nice. Remember, you must be logged in to Ravelry for the above link to work.


STAINED GLASS SCARF
Designed by Melinda Miller


This scarf was inspired by the stained glass designs of Frank Lloyd Wright.

Skill Level: Advanced Beginner

Materials: 3 oz. Each Caron Simply Soft Brites
CC = Lemonade, CD = Blue Mint
CE = Limelight
3 oz. Each Caron Simply Soft
CA = Black, CB = Red
Crochet hook size G/6 US – 4.0 mm
Tapestry needle
Multi-colored Pony Beads – 6x9 mm

Gauge: 12 sc = 3 ½ “

Stitches: Sc = single crochet
Hdc = half double crochet
Dc = double crochet
Tr = triple crochet


Size: Length = 70” without fringe
Width = 5 ½ “


With CA, ch 275, leaving a 10 yd. tail to finish border. Wind tail on bobbin.

Row 1: (right side): Sc into 2nd chain from hook, 1 sc into each ch to end, ch 1, turn.

Row 2: Work 1 sc into each sc to end. Fasten off. Turn.

Row 3: Attach CB. Ch 3 (count as 1 dc), skip 1st sc, 1 dc into next sc, 1 hdc into next sc, 1 sc into next sc, *ch 2, skip 2 sc, 1 sc into next sc, 1 hdc into next sc, 1 dc into each of next 2 sc, 1 tr into each of next 2 sc, 1 dc into each of next 2 sc, 1 hdc into next sc, 1 sc into next sc; repeat from * to last 6 sc, ch 2, skip 2 sc, 1 sc into next sc, 1 hdc into next sc, 1 dc into each of next 2 sc, ch 3, turn.

Row 4: Skip 1st dc, work 1 dc into next dc, 1 hdc into next hdc, 1 sc into next sc, *ch 2, 1 sc into next sc, 1 hdc into next hdc, 1 dc into each of next 2 dc, 1 tr into each of next 2 tr, 1 dc into each of next 2 dc, 1 hdc into next hdc, 1 sc into next sc; repeat from * to last 6 stitches, ch 2, 1 sc into next sc, 1 hdc into next hdc, 1 dc into next dc, 1 dc into 3rd of ch 3 at beginning of previous row. Fasten off.

Row 5: Attach CA. Ch 1, work 1 sc into each of first 4 stitches, [inserting hook from front of work, work 1 sc into each of the 2 free sc in CA 3 rows below], *1 sc into each of the next 10 stitches on previous row, work 2 sc 3 row below as before; repeat from * to last 4 stitches, 1 sc into each of next 3 stitches, 1 sc into 3rd of ch 3 at beginning of previous row, ch 1, turn.

Row 6: Work 1 sc into each of sc to end. Fasten off.

Row 7: Attach CC. Ch 1, * work 1 sc into first sc, 1 hdc into next sc, 1 dc into each of next 2 sc, 1 tr into each of next 2 sc, 1 dc into each of next 2 sc, 1 hdc into next sc, 1 sc into next sc, ch 2, skip 2 sc; repeat from * to end omitting ch 2 at end of last repeat, ch 1, turn.

Row 8: * Work 1 sc into next sc, 1 hdc into next hdc, 1 dc into each of next 2 dc, 1 tr into each of next 2 tr, 1 dc into each of next 2 dc, 1 hdc into next hdc, 1 sc into next sc, ch 2; repeat from * to end omitting ch 2 at end of last repeat. Fasten off.

Row 9: Attach CA. Ch 1, * 1 sc into each of next 10 stitches, inserting hook from front of work, work 1 sc into each of 2 free sc in CA 3 rows below; repeat from * omitting 2 sc at end of last repeat, ch 1, turn.

Row 10: Work 1 sc into each sc to end. Fasten off.

Row 11: Attach CD. Ch 3 (count as 1 dc), skip 1st sc, 1 dc into next sc, 1 hdc into next sc, 1 sc into next sc, *ch 2, skip 2 sc, 1 sc into next sc, 1 hdc into next sc, 1 dc into each of next 2 sc, 1 tr into each of next 2 sc, 1 dc into each of next 2 sc, 1 hdc into next sc, 1 sc into next sc; repeat from * to last 6 sc, ch 2, skip 2 sc, 1 sc into next sc, 1 hdc into next sc, 1 dc into each of next 2 sc, ch 3, turn.

Row 12: Skip 1st dc, work 1 dc into next dc, 1 hdc into next hdc, 1 sc into next sc, *ch 2, 1 sc into next sc, 1 hdc into next hdc, 1 dc into each of next 2 dc, 1 tr into each of next 2 tr, 1 dc into each of next 2 dc, 1 hdc into next hdc, 1 sc into next sc; repeat from * to last 6 stitches, ch 2, 1 sc into next sc, 1 hdc into next hdc, 1 dc into next dc, 1 dc into 3rd of ch 3 at beginning of previous row. Fasten off.

Row 13: Attach CA. Ch 1, work 1 sc into each of first 4 stitches, [inserting hook from front of work, work 1 sc into each of the 2 free sc in CA 3 rows below], *1 sc into each of the next 10 stitches on previous row, work 2 sc 3 rows below as before; repeat from * to last 4 stitches, 1 sc into each of next 3 stitches, 1 sc into 3rd ch of ch 3 at beginning of previous row, ch 1, turn.

Row 14: Work 1 sc into each of sc to end. Fasten off.

Row 15: Attach CE. Ch 1, * work 1 sc into first sc, 1 hdc into next sc, 1 dc into each of next 2 sc, 1 tr into each of next 2 sc, 1 dc into each of next 2 sc, 1 hdc into next sc, 1 sc into next sc, ch 2, skip 2 sc; repeat from * to end omitting ch 2 at end of last repeat, ch 1, turn.

Row 16: * Work 1 sc into next sc, 1 hdc into next hdc, 1 dc into each of next 2 dc, 1 tr into each of next 2 tr, 1 dc into each of next 2 dc, 1 hdc into next hdc, 1 sc into next sc, ch 2; repeat from * to end omitting ch 2 at end of last repeat. Fasten off.

Row 17: Attach CA. Ch 1, * 1 sc into each of next 10 stitches, inserting hook from front of work, work 1 sc into each of 2 free sc in CA 3 rows below; repeat from * omitting 2 sc at end of last repeat, ch 1, turn.

Row 18: Work 1 sc into each sc to endof row. Do not finish off. Save stitch with stitch marker.

Weave in all ends, except beginning tail. With WS facing, turn work with ends of Rows 1 – 18 facing and live stitch on right side. Take out stitch marker to begin work.



Row 19: Working along edge of rows, work 5 dc in middle of rows 3 & 4, 1 sc in middle of rows 5 & 6, 5 dc in middle of rows 7 & 8, 1 sc in middle of rows 9 & 10, 5 dc in middle of rows 11 & 12, 1 sc in middle of rows 13 & 14, 5 dc in middle of rows 15 & 16, 1 sl st in first sc of row 18. Weave in end.



Row 20: With RS facing, turn work to opposite end and repeat row 19 with beginning tail.



Beaded fringe: Make as many fringe pieces as desired for each end of scarf. Model shows 7 fringes on each end.



Cut a 24” length of Black and thread through tapestry needle. Thread one bead onto the yarn, resting in the middle.



Thread the needle through the bead again and pull to tighten. This first bead will act as the anchor for the rest of the beads.



Now thread the other end of the yarn through the needle.




Thread the remainder of the beads onto the needle and push down on top of the anchor bead. You will have the two loose ends of yarn available to attach to the end of the scarf. Weave in ends.




Copyright - This Stained Glass Scarf pattern & photos are copyright 2009 by Melinda Miller. Free for your own personal use only. Per copyright law, do not redistribute (with or without charge) in any form. (Redistributing to others includes by photocopies, scanning, emailing, putting on a CD, posting in Internet forum messages, putting on another web site and any other manner of distribution.)

I hope you enjoy this pattern. Happy Hooking!

15 comments:

  1. this is quite lovely! thanks for sharing. :)

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  2. Congratulations! This is quite unique and I love it, thanks as well for sharing the pattern.

    Kind regards.

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  3. Wow ! I can't wait to make this! I love scarves but this one, you can wear when alot of different outfits.

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  4. This is BEAUTIFUL! I'm going to try it right after getting back from Father's Day celebration! Doesn't seem too difficult, either, and it looks like it WOULD be...thanks so much for the pattern.......Have a good day..............Dianne

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  5. Wonderful! For a summer scarf, this could be done with light colors, as you mentioned, and a light/neutral border color. Thank you for sharing!

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  6. I read that I can't sell your pattern or use the pictures, but may I sell scarves I make as long as I give you credit for the pattern?

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    Replies
    1. Yes, you may sell scarves that you make, just do not sell or distribute the pattern or use my photos. You can provide a link to my blog if needed. Hope this answers your question. :)

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  7. This is beautiful! I love Frank Lloyd Wright designs and this does remind me of his work...well done and a great pattern. Thanks for sharing.

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  8. i loved it, can you plese make a video tutorial for that i will highly appreciate it ,,,,

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  9. Melinda,
    I have a great "fishy" idea for this. You could do the scarf in black outlines and using any ocean like color (aqua, turquoise, sea green)and a nice shade of goldfish orange.
    1. two rows of ocean color.
    2. one row of goldfish orange.
    3. one row of ocean color.
    4. one row of goldfish orange.
    5. two more rows of ocean color.
    Complete the scarf use matching aqua and orange beads.Then, go back and make with black yarn french knots or X's where the goldfish eye's would be. This could make a great child's scarf (maybe no beads for little mouths to swallow) or a great gift for someone in a tropical or coastal area.
    Love,
    Sharon Miller Rosner
    ps: These Millers are really smart people!!!!

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    Replies
    1. Hi Sharon - You're idea sounds really cute. If you decide to work it up this way, please email me a photo of it, and I'll post it on my Blog. I'd love to see it! :)

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  10. I have used this pattern with various shades of purple but am having a problem with the fringe. I don't understand how you attach the loose ends of the beaded fringe to look nice and be secure. Do you have specific suggestions?

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  11. Is there a matching hat for this scarf - The Stained Glass? Would like to make matching scaf & hat for Xmas gift. Thanks

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  12. Bless you I have been searching for this pattern....I saw it in an afghan and thought it was saved. I want to make an afghan using jewel tones and it will be large at least 70" square or 70"X90". I have used beads and just put them on the yarn first and then crocheted them in place as needed. Have a wonderful Thanksgiving.

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  13. Hi, I am a bit of a beginner to crochet and so still getting to grips with all the different wools available. I can't seem to find Caron wool in the UK so I was wondering what type of wool it is please?
    Would love to try this pattern as it looks so lovely :)

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